The most common cause of a failing car aircon is that you’ve run out of refrigerant—topping it up is a pretty straightforward process. However, more serious problems stem from broken condensers and compressors or even faults in your car’s electrical supply or components.

Our Fixter mechanics have all the answers and can get your AC working as usual in no time.

Why has my car air conditioning stopped working?

If you’ve run out of refrigerant, then your icy cool cabin will start to feel warm and sticky on those hot summer days. A refrigerant top-up will remedy the situation quickly and easily, but if the problem is more serious, it could lead to costly repairs or replacements.

Regular maintenance can keep your car’s AC in tip-top condition, providing years of trouble-free operation, and, as part of your regular service and MOT, you shouldn’t have to make any special, additional trips to the garage.

What are the common causes of a faulty car air conditioner?

You’re out of refrigerant

Risk level – Low

What to do Top up your AC refrigerant.

Whether your AC has used up all of its refrigerant or it’s leaked out somehow, you won’t get any cool air through your vents when you hit the on-switch. If it’s just run out, a top-up or recharge will have you back to normal in no time, but if you’ve developed a leak, you need to track it down and seal it up to remedy the problem once and for all.

The cooling fans are broken

Risk level – Low

What to do – Fix faulty components and replace damaged fans.

Just like any other heating or cooling system, your car AC uses fans to distribute the cool air. If those fans are faulty, damaged or broken, they won’t drive the cool air around your car as required. It could be as simple an issue as a blown fuse or even a short in the electrical system. Occasionally, they can even suffer damage from debris thrown up from the road.

There’s an issue with the compressor 

Risk level – Low

What to do Repair or replace your stuck compressor.

The compressor keeps the air and coolant moving around your air conditioning system, and if it’s not working, neither is your AC. The most likely problem results from being unused over long periods where you don’t need the AC. This gives the compressor a chance get stuck—either in the on or off position, and needs freeing up to get back to its normal operation.

Your condenser is faulty or broken

Risk level – Low

What to do – Replace the faulty AC condenser.

The condenser