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How much does front brake pads replacement costs for a Toyota?

The cost of a front brake pads replacement on a Toyota depends on your car model and engine. Also, depending on your location, the price of a front brake pads replacement on your Toyota can vary.

Vehicle Dealer price (average) Saving

Toyota Auris Hybrid

1.8 litres

£151.37 £126.14 17%

Toyota Auris Icon D4

1.4 litres

£118.05 £101.15 14%

Toyota Auris Icon Vvt

1.8 litres

£126.10 £104.13 17%

Toyota 4 Runner

3.0 litres

£136.01 £112.88 17%

Toyota Auris Tr D

2.0 litres

£123.10 £101.15 18%

Toyota Auris Tr Vvt

1.6 litres

£126.49 £107.10 15%

Toyota Auris Sr Vvt

1.6 litres

£125.54 £102.15 19%

Toyota Auris Icon Valvematic

1.6 litres

£130.16 £104.13 20%

Toyota Auris Icon Vvt

1.8 litres

£131.66 £108.10 18%

Toyota Auris Tr

1.3 litres

£127.72 £105.12 18%

Toyota Auris Excel Vvt

1.8 litres

£123.41 £106.11 14%

Toyota Auris Sr Valvematic

1.6 litres

£125.89 £104.13 17%

Find out more about pricing

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front brake pads replacement reviews for Toyota

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Front brake pad replacement

How do front brake pads work?

Brake pads are a key component of any vehicle’s braking system. They’re flat parts made of semi-metallic, organic or ceramic materials, with a metal backing. When you use your brakes, the pads hydraulically squeeze the brake discs, slowing your car down through friction and pressure. The pads absorb some of the biggest forces involved in daily driving.

Most cars have two pads per brake disc, although some high-performance models can have more.

What happens when we replace your brake pads?

How often should rear brake pads need replacing?

As a rough guide, your brake pads should last for 50,000 miles, but there are a number of variables, including driver behaviour, the weight you carry, speed and the type of pads used. Not to mention that nearly 20% of MOT failures are caused by faulty brakes.

The law, vehicle regulations and your MOT

Incorrect brake operation, damaged or excessively worn discs or pads are considered unsafe for your vehicle performance and will cause your car to fail an MOT.

The cost of replacing front brake pads

The typical cost of replacing front brake pads is around £100.

For example, a BMW 116d M Sport would have a dealer price of £133.13, yet Fixter will carry out the same work for only £107.10—a 20% saving!

Changing the rear brake pads on a Fiat 500 C Lounge will cost you £120.59 with your dealer, but only £99.17 with Fixter—a superb saving of 18%!

When you choose Fixter to find you a great deal and a premium mechanic to carry out your rear brake pad replacement, you can expect to save around £20–£25 from an average dealer price. That’s a typical saving in the region of 15–20%.

What causes your brake pads to stop working correctly?

While your brake pads will keep you safe over thousands of miles, they won’t last forever. Eventually, the abrasive surface on them wears down, and they will need to be replaced, ideally while you still have around 25% capacity of the pads left.

Given that they take most of the load, front brake pads will probably need replacing first. They also have a bigger surface area to increase friction.

To make your brake pads last longer:

Symptoms of malfunctioning brakes

Your brake callipers make unusual noises

A loud screeching or grinding noise when you apply the brakes is a clear indicator that new pads are required.

When your car pulls to one side under braking

If only one brake is working correctly, it can cause your car to pull in the direction of the functioning brake.

The car vibrates under braking

Your brake pads could be warped if the pedal vibrates when you press down on it.

The brake pad is worn down

Look through the wheel’s spokes for a visual check—the outside pad is pressed against a metal rotor, and you should be able to see at least 3mm of the pad.

Your brake warning light on the dashboard is illuminated

If any of your dashboard warning lights are illuminated, the sensor that detects problems or worn out parts and components has detected an issue and activated the system.

Toyota

The Toyota Motor Corporation is a Japanese multinational automotive manufacturer, established in 1937, over 80 years ago.

How popular is Toyota in the United Kingdom?

Toyota was the first manufacturer to produce more than 10million vehicles a year, and it has continued to do so since 2012. There are currently 1.7million on the roads in the UK—a number that has shown consistent growth since their introduction to the UK market.

High-quality motoring—right across the board

Toyota’s current range features luxury saloons, hatchbacks and SUVs, all of which are receiving the steady design upgrade from what were once sensible and steady looking vehicles, into sleeker looking executive sports lines, capable of turning heads at every junction.

Toyota: Market leaders in all-electric and hybrid motoring

Worldwide, Toyota is the market leader in hybrid electric vehicle sales. It’s introduction of the Prius in 1997, the first commercially mass-produced vehicle of its kind, set them on their way as leaders in the field. The UK is no exception, as there are over 80k Prius models on our roads.

There’s more to Toyota than good economy and sensible motoring

As much as the modern market leans towards family SUV motoring and super efficient hybrid fuel economy, don’t be fooled into thinking Toyota is stuck into a single groove.

For those who want more excitement than economy from their driving experience, Toyota makes a selection of cars with much more clout than their sensible city options.

Grab a Toyota GR Supra and you’ll be propelled from 0–62mph in 4.3 seconds using every ounce of its 335bhp. If you want a car that was built for fun and have a spare £52k to lose, then why not put one on your shopping list? As with other Toyota models, it offers great value for the amount of car you’ll be getting.

Toyota’s reliability and reputation

Toyota ranked 3rd place out of 30 car brands in the What Car? Reliability Survey in 2018. They were only just pipped at the post, and by less than 1% for the top spot, by Suzuki; 2nd place went to their very own luxury division, Lexus.

Recent Toyota recalls and reliability issues

Various recalls have been made on Toyota models throughout their motoring history. The following are a list of the most recent in the UK and Europe.

12/05/2019 – Toyota Yaris (2014–2017)

The wire harnesses of the side airbag sensors could crack and the wires may corrode

04/05/2019 – Toyota RAV4 and Toyota Corolla (2018–2019)

The emergency calling system may not be correctly installed

12/01/2019 – Toyota ProAce (2016–2018)

The tightening torque of the threaded connection between the ball joint and knuckle may decrease… and 2 other issues

23/11/2018 – Toyota Aygo (2005–2014)

The glass on the rear door is not properly glued

23/11/2018 – Toyota Yaris, Toyota Corolla, Toyota Picnic and Toyota Avensis (2001–2006)

The ammonium nitrate propellant used in the airbag inflator may degrade over time due to heat cycles

23/11/2018 – Toyota Corolla/Verso and Toyota Avensis (2001–2006)

The airbag control module for the supplemental restraint system has been assembled with application-specific integrated circuits that are susceptible to internal shorting

17/11/2018 – Toyota Auris HV and Toyota Prius/Plus (2010–2014)

Due to a software error in the ECU, the vehicle may not enter in a fail-safe driving mode

16/11/2018 – Toyota GT86 (2012–2013)

Due to a production error of the valve sprint, performance load may exceed the valve spring’s fatigue strength and may fracture

All recall information sourced from gov.co.uk data.

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