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How much does front brake pads replacement costs for a Porsche?

The cost of a front brake pads replacement on a Porsche depends on your car model and engine. Also, depending on your location, the price of a front brake pads replacement on your Porsche can vary.

Vehicle Dealer price (average) Saving

Porsche 928

5.0 litres

£135.20 £110.72 18%

Porsche Cayenne E Hybrid

3.0 litres

£142.72 £117.17 18%

Porsche 944

3.0 litres

£132.26 £111.80 15%

Porsche Cayman S

3.4 litres

£143.27 £116.10 19%

Porsche 718 Cayman S

2.0 litres

£130.67 £107.10 18%

Porsche Boxster

2.7 litres

£137.23 £116.10 15%

Porsche 911 Carrera 2

3.5 litres

£128.88 £110.72 14%

Porsche 911 Carrera

3.4 litres

£142.92 £116.10 19%

Porsche 911 Targa

3.1 litres

£126.92 £108.58 14%

Porsche Cayman

2.7 litres

£127.74 £109.65 14%

Porsche 911 Targa Tiptronic

3.6 litres

£136.08 £110.72 19%

Porsche 911

3.0 litres

£141.18 £113.95 19%

Find out more about pricing

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front brake pads replacement reviews for Porsche

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Front brake pad replacement

How do front brake pads work?

Brake pads are a key component of any vehicle’s braking system. They’re flat parts made of semi-metallic, organic or ceramic materials, with a metal backing. When you use your brakes, the pads hydraulically squeeze the brake discs, slowing your car down through friction and pressure. The pads absorb some of the biggest forces involved in daily driving.

Most cars have two pads per brake disc, although some high-performance models can have more.

What happens when we replace your brake pads?

How often should rear brake pads need replacing?

As a rough guide, your brake pads should last for 50,000 miles, but there are a number of variables, including driver behaviour, the weight you carry, speed and the type of pads used. Not to mention that nearly 20% of MOT failures are caused by faulty brakes.

The law, vehicle regulations and your MOT

Incorrect brake operation, damaged or excessively worn discs or pads are considered unsafe for your vehicle performance and will cause your car to fail an MOT.

The cost of replacing front brake pads

The typical cost of replacing front brake pads is around £100.

For example, a BMW 116d M Sport would have a dealer price of £133.13, yet Fixter will carry out the same work for only £107.10—a 20% saving!

Changing the rear brake pads on a Fiat 500 C Lounge will cost you £120.59 with your dealer, but only £99.17 with Fixter—a superb saving of 18%!

When you choose Fixter to find you a great deal and a premium mechanic to carry out your rear brake pad replacement, you can expect to save around £20–£25 from an average dealer price. That’s a typical saving in the region of 15–20%.

What causes your brake pads to stop working correctly?

While your brake pads will keep you safe over thousands of miles, they won’t last forever. Eventually, the abrasive surface on them wears down, and they will need to be replaced, ideally while you still have around 25% capacity of the pads left.

Given that they take most of the load, front brake pads will probably need replacing first. They also have a bigger surface area to increase friction.

To make your brake pads last longer:

Symptoms of malfunctioning brakes

Your brake callipers make unusual noises

A loud screeching or grinding noise when you apply the brakes is a clear indicator that new pads are required.

When your car pulls to one side under braking

If only one brake is working correctly, it can cause your car to pull in the direction of the functioning brake.

The car vibrates under braking

Your brake pads could be warped if the pedal vibrates when you press down on it.

The brake pad is worn down

Look through the wheel’s spokes for a visual check—the outside pad is pressed against a metal rotor, and you should be able to see at least 3mm of the pad.

Your brake warning light on the dashboard is illuminated

If any of your dashboard warning lights are illuminated, the sensor that detects problems or worn out parts and components has detected an issue and activated the system.

Porsche

Porsche AG is a German automobile manufacturer, established over 88 years ago in 1931, and is renowned for producing high-performance sports cars, SUVs and saloon cars.

Porsche is owned by Volkswagen AG and carries a total equity of over €10billion (according to 2015 figures).

How popular is Porsche in the United Kingdom?

Who wouldn’t want a Porsche? Porsche has been setting standards in high-performance sports vehicles for as long as they’ve been in the industry.

There are currently around 146k Porsche vehicles on the roads in the UK, showing a steady rise in numbers over the past 10 years.

Luxury, high-end performance sports cars

With a back catalogue of historic models too numerous to mention, the current range provides typical 2-seat mid-engine sports cars in the Porsche 718 and Porsche 911 models, luxury touring in the Panamera 4-seat full-size saloon and a luxurious level of crossover driving in the Cayenne and Macan SUVs.

Sporting a selection of SUV models

Given the popularity of the SUV in modern driving, it was only a matter of time until the high-end marques got involved in revving up the performance and presentation.

For example, the Cayenne Turbo can accelerate from 0–62mph in 4.1 seconds with a top speed of 177mph. The hybrid electric model is equally as impressive with figures of 5.0 seconds and 157mph. That should take care of the school run in record time.

Porsche electric: the plug-in hybrid range

In 2010, the both Porsche SUV models and the Porsche 918 were released as hybrid electric versions. Currently, only the Cayenne is available as an electric hybrid, but Porsche is building towards the release of their E-performance range: with the new Taycan all-electric sports car being developed through the Mission E Cross Turismo concept study.

Porsche’s reliability and reputation

Porsche ranked 23rd out of 30 car brands in the What Car? Reliability Survey in 2018. High-end sports cars aren’t renowned for their reliability, so for Porsche to achieve a 90.9% efficiency rate could be seen as quite an accomplishment.

Recent Porsche recalls and reliability issues

Various recalls have been made on Porsche models throughout their motoring history. The following are a list of the most recent in the UK and Europe.

10/05/2019 – Porsche Cayenne (2018)

The shock-absorber forks fitted on the front axle may be defective and could break

22/02/2019 – Porsche Cayenne and Porsche Macan (2017–2018)

The retaining straps on the vehicle’s ski bag may be defective

03/02/2019 – Porsche Cayenne, Porsche Macan, Porsche 911 Carrera and Porsche Panamera (2014–2015)

It is possible that the vehicles do not meet the series standards applicable at the time of delivery

28/09/2018 – Porsche 918 Spyder (2013–2015)

The bolts used to mount the longitudinal and transverse suspension arms may corrode over time

28/09/2018 – Porsche Cayenne (2016–2018)

The seatbelt buckles on the central rear seat are defective

28/09/2018 – Porsche Panamera (2015–2018)

Restricted durability of the coupling rods may affect the functioning of the rear anti-roll stabiliser

25/04/2017 – Porsche 911 and Porsche Boxster (2017)

The windscreen might not be correctly bonded to the bodywork

21/04/2017 – Porsche (11 (2016–2017)

There is a possibility that the passenger airbags were manufactured with faulty components

All recall information sourced from gov.co.uk data.

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